The Role of Open Global Forum in Correcting Scientific Mistakes: Evidence from Retraction Watch

Author:International Office     Date:2016-12-23

Lecturer:  Prof. Bernard C.Y. Tan, Haifeng Xu 

Date: 13:30—14:30 21th Oct.2016

Venue: Room 102, 3rd Teaching Building

Language: English

 

About the Lecturer
Professor Bernard C Y Tan is Vice Provost (Undergraduate Education) at the National University of Singapore. He assists the Provost in setting educational directions and policies, and in assuring educational quality for the University. He has oversight of Registrar's Office, Office of Admissions, Centre for Development of Teaching and Learning  and the Centre for Instructional Technology.

Prof Tan's research interests include social media, virtual communities, and Internet commerce. He has given talks and keynote addresses at various international conferences. His research work has been published in major international journals and conference proceedings in the field of information systems.


About the Lecture
Retraction of flawed articles is an important approach to correct scientific mistakes. However, it is common that retracted papers continue to be cited by other scientific articles. To avoid this situation, journal editors called for an open global forum to share retraction related information and correct academic mistakes. Nevertheless, whether the establishment of such forums can prevent researchers from citing retracted articles remains unknown. In this study, we make use of the emergence of Retraction Watch, which is a forum to post scientific retraction events, to investigate the role of open global forum in correcting scientific mistakes. Through PSM and DID analyses, our results show that compared to retracted articles which are not reported in Retraction Watch, open forum reporting leads to a significant decline in the post-retraction yearly citations. Moreover, from retraction reason perspective, this effect is more salient for non-self-reported articles, and articles retracted due to misconduct. From author perspective, this effect is not significant for retracted papers written by authors with top or bottom level reputation, but more salient for papers written by authors with middle level reputation. From country perspective, this effect is more salient for articles written by authors from developed countries compared to those from developing countries.


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